Home  |   Recipes  |    USA Federation Web Site   USA Federation Web Site  |  
FPAQ
The Maple Industry
Maple Syrup
Origin
The "Run" and the Production Method
Video on maple syrup
Classification of Maple Syrup
Certifications
Nutritional Value of Maple Products
Antioxidant Value
Glycemic Index
Preservation
Maple Products Showcase
Recipe booklets
Quality Assurance
Media Section


Industry
Importers
Restaurants
Producers



Discover 100% pure maple syrup in restauration and gastronomy


NAPSI certified - Natural, Authentic, Pure, Sterile, Integral

Classification of Maple Syrup

There are two types of classifications for maple syrup: the federal government classification and that of the provincial governments. Quebec's maple farmers have the option of following either of the two regulations in effect. However, they must abide by federal regulations when exporting their product to another province or country.

Federal Classification
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) governs the food safety and quality of maple products in Canada and is responsible for the "federal" classification of maple syrup. This classification standard includes three categories and five grades of syrup:

Canada #1 (Extra light, Light, Medium)
Canada #2 (Amber)
Canada #3 (Dark) and syrups from any other category with flavour flaws

Category No.1
Extra light


Light


Medium






In order to be classified as "Canada No. 1” category, maple syrup must meet the standards of section 5 of the Canadian food regulations, and:

a) must not ferment;
b) must have a clear and uniform colour;
c) its colour grade must be Extra Light, Light, or Medium; and it
d) must have a maple flavour that is typical of its colour grade, and be free of any unpleasant odours or flavours.

* Maple products regulations (C.R.C., ch 289)
Category
No. 2
Amber In order to be classified as "Canada No. 2” category, maple syrup must meet the standards of section 5 of the Canadian food regulations, and:

a) must not ferment;
b) must have a clear and uniform colour;
c) its colour grade must be Amber, and it
d) must have a maple flavour that is typical of its colour grade, and be free of any unpleasant odours or flavours.

* Maple products regulations (C.R.C., ch 289)

Category
No. 3
Dark, or any other ungraded category

+




In order to be classified as "Canada No. 3” category, maple syrup must meet the standards of section 5 of the Canada food regulations, have a typical maple syrup flavour and:

a) must not ferment;
b) must have a clear and uniform colour;
c) its colour grade must be Extra Light, Light, Medium, Amber or Dark;
d) must be free of any unpleasant odours or flavours, but must contain traces of caramel, plant bud or sap flavours.

* Maple products regulations (C.R.C., ch 289)

Source: Table provided by the Fédération des producteurs acéricoles du Québec; contents provided by the CFIA

Provincial Classification
The government of Quebec has issued Maple Products Regulations which establish two categories and five colour classes for maple syrup according to clarity, density and characteristic maple flavour, while ensuring the product meets all quality standards.

The categories and colour classes are detailed in the following table. The provincial regulations require that Dark maple syrup be used only for industrial purposes.


Category No.1
Extra light

Light

Medium

Amber






Maple syrup belongs to Category No.1 if it:

a) has a clear and uniform colour;
b) has a flavour that is typical of maple syrup;
c) does not contain any flavour of caramel or sap, or traces of insoluble calcium malate;
d) shows only traces of cristallization.

* Food regulations (c. P-29, r.1)
Category No. 2


Extra light

Light

Medium

Amber

Dark




Maple syrup belongs to Category No.2 if it:

a) is clear in colour;
b) has a flavour that is typical of maple syrup;
c) shows only traces of cristallization;
d) has any of these defects: flavour of caramel or sap, or traces of insoluble calcium malate.

* Food regulations (c. P-29, r.1)
Source: Table provided by the Fédération des producteurs acéricoles du Québec; contents provided by MAPAQ


Federal and provincial classifications are based on maple syrup's degree of light transmission, measured by a visual method involving a spectrophotometer.